My July List of Shows to Watch

Good Omens (Amazon Prime): After Fleabag, this is a show I will most highly recommend. Based on the book, Good Omens: The Nice and Accurate Prophecies by Agnes Nutter, Witch by Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman, this is an outrageously funny and wicked series. The premise is simple. Armageddon is scheduled to occur on Earth within a week, the Anti-Christ has been born, and Heaven and Hell are primed and ready, as this epochal event will finally decide the supremacy of one of them. But thwarting these fine plans of God and Satan are their respective representatives on Earth – Angel (played by Michael Sheen) and Demon Crawley (played by David Tennant). These two who have known each other for more than 6,000 years, have struck a rather good rapport, complete with banter, sarcasm, and dare I say it, ‘bromance’! They have seen each other through thick and thin since Adam and Eve, and every historical event since. They have rescued each other from sticky situations, and in the process, have also got mighty comfortable living among humans, and are rather loathe to give that up. Hence, their plan to thwart Armageddon, and try and together influence the Anti-Christ, a boy growing up peacefully in a village (due to a hilarious mixup), to become a fine, balanced young man. When the day of Armageddon finally arrives, matters come to a head, but Angel and Demon have the last laugh.

For me, the best part of Good Omens is the chemistry between the goody-goody, naive, and eager-to-please ‘Angel’ Michael Sheen, and the arrogant, yet heart-in-the-right-place swagger of ‘Demon’ David Tennant. If you have seen Broadchurch then you will know Tennant as detective Alec Hardy, and believe me, it requires some leap of imagination to connect him to this loose-limbed, utterly cynical Demon Crawley. They are brilliant actors, brilliantly cast. Not that there is anything to cavil about the rest of the cast. Jon Hamm (Don Draper of Mad Men) as Archangel Gabriel is deliciously ironic and masterful, and Frances McDormand as God and the narrator for the series, is outstanding. In fact, the narrator is as much the star as the story and the  actors. Do not miss this one for anything.

Chernobyl (Hotstar): As the name suggests, this series is a docu-drama based on the April 26, 1986 explosion at the Chernobyl nuclear power station near Pripyat, Ukraine, with was then part of the Soviet Union. It’s a gripping re-enactment of the precise events – man-made and scientific – which led to this horrific accident, in which many lost their lives, and thousands more had to deal with radiation-related illnesses. A large swathe of area around the power station is still an abandoned, exclusion zone, and likely to be for the foreseeable future. The series highlights the work of all those who responded to this accident, and all those who tried to cover up, including the State of Soviet Union, then headed by Gorbachev, which lied to the international community about the magnitude, and the cause of this accident. This series is a gripping thriller, and you will be most tempted to binge watch the series. In a departure from the usual, the actors all speak English, with no particularly local accent. A refreshing change indeed.

Homecoming (Amazon Prime): I saw Julia Roberts’s name on the cast of this series and decided to watch it. This is a thriller in a sense, as we remain tantalisingly close to discovering what happened at the Homecoming Transitional Support Centre run by the Geist group in the US, which exists ostensibly to help soldiers transition smoothly into civilian life. The place has counsellors, and all the other facilities expected of such a place. Julia Roberts is a counsellor too. But in the present, when the movie begins, she’s a waiter at a small cafe, with nary a memory of what exactly it was that she did at Homecoming, and what was her role in a particular incident involving a young veteran. Is Homecoming truly a place of transition into civilian life, or does it have a more sinister purpose? Quite a gripping series.

Nothing to Hide (Netflix): Ever since I watched The Chalet and Call My Agent, two thoroughly entertaining French series, I have been on the lookout for more French shows to watch. Nothing to Hide is about four couples and a single friend who meet up for dinner at one of their houses. As the evening begins, an impromptu rule is made – everyone will surrender their phones and any message or call that comes on any of the phones, will be shared with everyone. Some resist this, but soon, all phones are piled up in the centre of the table. Well, one can imagine the confusion and tragic-comic situations that ensue. Some truths are revealed, some lives unravel, some lies upturned. But was it a real game? Certainly, a lovely watch on a rainy day.

Hamid (Netflix): India’s Kashmir has many, many untold stories. Lately, a few movies have been made highlighting the truth of life in Kashmir, without being preachy. One such is Hamid. It’s told from the point of view of an eight-year-old boy, Hamid, whose father, like many Kashmiri men, has vanished when he stepped out of their house to buy a pair of batteries. The mother (played ably by Rasika Dugal), joins the unrelenting ranks of the Kashmiri ‘half-widows’, women whose husbands have disappeared, with no confirmation of whether they are alive or dead. These widows’ lives are defined by daily visits to police stations and check-points, in the hope of some information, some glimmer of hope. Meanwhile, Hamid decides to contact Allah and dials a number, which happens to belong to an Indian Army officer! Their conversations are hilarious, yet poignant, and reflect the conundrums on both sides of the conflict. A true gem of a movie. You won’t be dry-eyed by the end of it. I was also left with the yearning to somehow magically wave a wand and make it all right for everyone in that troubled state.